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Sunny day exploring Cornwall…

St Michael’s Mount, the extraordinary Minack Theatre, Lands End and more…  These are the highlights from yet another glorious day exploring…

Starting in our lovely manor as the sun was beaming in the beautiful bay window, Karen and I met up and the headed off…

…and in case we were peckish, we had some Rudolph jerky on which to nibble…

Arriving in Marazion to horses on the road and on the beach – I love it!

St Michael’s Mount at high tide is an island, and at low tide is a tiny outcrop of land.  There has been one form of monastery or other on the site since the 8th century.

Its Cornish name is Karrek Loos yn Koos, literally meaning ‘the grey rock in a wood’.

At high tide, the man-made causeway is completely under water.

 

 

Next stop, the Minack Theatre…

The Minack Theatre (or Gwaryjy Minack in Cornish), gives one the feeling of being in an exotic location in Italy or similar…

According to Wikipedia:  “The theatre was the brainchild of Rowena Cade, who moved to Cornwall after the First World War and built a house for herself and her mother on land at Minack Point for £100.[3] Her sister was the feminist dystopian author Katharine Burdekin and her partner lived with them from the 1920s.  In 1929, a local village group of players had staged Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream in a nearby meadow at Crean, repeating the production the next year. They decided that their next production would be The Tempest and Miss Cade offered the garden of her house as a suitable location, as it was beside the sea. Miss Cade and her gardener, Billy Rawlings, made a terrace and rough seating, hauling materials down from the house or up via the winding path from the beach below. In 1932, The Tempest was performed with the sea as a dramatic backdrop, to great success. Miss Cade resolved to improve the theatre, working over the course of the winter months each year throughout her life (with the help of Billy Rawlings and Charles Angove) so that others might perform each summer.”

Hmmmmmm, yes – my thinks that is stating the obvious!  🙂

…and here is when the alien space ship finally came down to collect us…

From there, it was meandering over to Land’s End…

…and along the way being stopped by traffic geese…

…and then suddenly I felt as though I had been transported to a cheap American theme park…  Welcome to Land’s End.

Needless to say, we didn’t stay long and instead headed off in search of somewhere lovely for lunch…

…and the dip in the roof is unfortunately not an optical illusion…

Anywhere that has fresh yellow roses and books is a winner with me!

After a lovely lunch and live music (smooth, cool jazz feel) that I could have listened to for hours and hours, we headed toward home base…

…grabbed a cab and went into Falmouth for wine, food, wine and more wine…

No, this is not a huge chimney for the building – well, not exactly…  read on…

This building used to be Customs House…

…right next to the Harbour Master’s office, complete with lookout bay window…

This is Jack – local celebrity…

He orders his drinks at the bar…

This is our trusty bartender with Karen’s chocolate Baileys…

Back to Jack – he has a calendar, raising money for the air ambulance.  When I adopt my next fluffy, me thinks we will do something similar for a local cause…

Then we arrived back to the manor and, being the only residents, duly sat in the bar consuming a nightcap (or two) and singing a range of songs, much to the amusement of the bartender!

The following morning (Monday) we set out to head back to Torquay, with a minor detour…  Karen needed to run an errand along the way so while she was taking care of that, I headed off to do some more exploring…

…and we stopped for lunch at one of my favourite quirky pubs…  The Highwayman Inn…

Then back to sunshine in Torquay…

…dropped Karen at the train station, dropped my luggage at home, then off for dinner and drinks with another lovely friend, Rachael…

…and now finally back home…

This weekend feels like it was a month full of fun – I had such a wonderful time, full of laughs, fabulous company, interesting scenery…

I feel so very, very blessed…

~ Bella

Rainy day day exploring Cornwall

My dear friend Karen came over from Hastings for a long weekend and we are spending it exploring Cornwall.

Although today was raining all day long, we had a lovely time!

Starting in our lovely hotel – Penmere Manor.  Built in 1825, it was originally home to Captain John Bullock of the Falmouth Packet Service.

During WWII, the manor was turned into a home for injured officers; and after that it became a teaching convent for girls for a short period.

Since 1958, the manor has been operating as a hotel.

When we arrived on Friday (yesterday) evening, the lovely receptionist arranged a taxi for us and we went into Falmouth Harbour to the lovely Chain Locker Restaurant.

…and toasting to some wonderful business news I received the day prior.

Back to today, we went exploring to St Anthony’s Lighthouse and although we essentially found it, the thought of trekking to it – whether in good weather or bad – we decided to head somewhere lovely tu curl up for lunch instead.  Hmmmmmm, do you notice a theme here…  LOL!

The Pandora Inn was built in the 1200’s and has a fabulous vibe…

On the way back to the manor, we just meandered down this road and that…

…and came across the delightful Greenbank Hotel, Falmouth’s oldest hotel.

Originally built in 1640, the hotel has had quite the history…

In 1907, Florence Nightingale stayed here and her name can still be seen in the guest book on display by reception. Additionally, Kenneth Grahame stayed at the hotel in 1907 and it was here that he wrote letters to his son, which later formed the stories that became ‘The Wind in the Willows’.

This lovely couple shared their high tea yummies with us!

Check out this amazing decanter chandelier!

…then headed back home…

…for wine in front of the fire…  (hmmmmmm, no – no theme here……)

What a glorious day!

Until tomorrow…

~ Bella

 

 

Husky sledding in the snow in Scotland

After sleeping in (hmmmm, that is definitely becoming a habit on this trip!) I bundled up with my winter woollies, and headed off to find “Husky Haven” where I was to have my first dog sled experience – in the snow!

The dogs are adorably stunningly glorious..!

The man with the sun beaming down on him is Wattie McDonald, a two-time veteran of the world-famous Iditarod husky sled race in Alaska – and an absolute wealth of knowledge!

The dogs are truly incredible, each with a unique personality…

Although I programmed the holodeck (more on that in another post) to have some light snow before a bright sunny day for our adventure, there wasn’t quite enough snow to break out the skis, so we went with the wheeled version…

First, we need to get the dogs dressed (harnessed) and ready for the party…

This beloved fluffkin decided my skirt was the perfect place to curl up…

When they get excited, the sound is incredible!

…all hooked up, and…

…we are off!

…and these photos do not do justice to just how cool (no pun intended given the snow! LOL!) this was!

The quad-bike stayed ahead as our safety lookout…

We stopped half-way to give the dogs a rest…

The scenery was awesome, in the literal sense of the word…

Back home and off to the bar for a drink…

The blurs below are husky puppies – that are sooooooooooo cute!

I decided this fluffkin could come home with me to curl up together for a movie night…

Eventually back to Prince (trusty car) and note the temperature…

…then back home for hot soup and a glass or two of wine in front of a roaring fire…

A PERFECT day!!!

If you are in Scotland, I absolutely recommend you contact Wattie at Husky Haven!

Oh, and before I sign off, I just updated the post on the incredible Jacobite Train journey with a video some new friends just sent to me… http://luxuriousnomad.com/jacobite-train-aka-hogwarts-express/ – that was yet another extraordinary day!

~ Bella

My other Scottish Castle…

From their website:  “Ardoe House sits on an estate which was part of a 1,000 acre parcel of land gifted to Arbroath Abbey by Alexander II, King of Scotland way back in in 1244. It has been described and divided throughout the centuries as the sunny half and the shady half.

Ardoe House was built by Alexander Milne Ogston, the son of a successful Aberdeen soap and candle manufacturer known locally as ‘Soapie’ Ogston. As well as erecting the fashionable mansion house, he beautified the whole estate with plantations. At the time, taking pride in one’s Scottish roots was exceptionally important, and much of Alexander’s choices for his prized home reflect this.

For instance, the architect he chose was James Matthew, one of the architects behind Drummuir Castle, Aldourie Castle, Ballindalloch Castle, and work on Cawdor Castle. The Scottish Baronial style chosen for Ardoe House was a popular style, first created for a house built for the famous writer, Sir Walter Scott, whose works fired up renewed passion for Scotland.”

~ Bella

 

 

Awe-inspiring Elgin Cathedral

Upon leaving my northern Scottish castle in Tain, the sun was shining, and it was a magnificent day!

I did have to sit in the car for a while to warm it up and to remove the eighth-inch layer of ice on the windscreen before heading off in 2oC / 35oF temperature – and I could not have asked for a more perfect day!

Along the way, there was field after field with bales of hay – thanks to such a fabulous winter!  There has been so much sun, that the farmers have been able to get two cuttings of hay – a feat that hasn’t been achieved for many years…

My initial destination, Elgin Cathedral ruins…  I was expecting something lovely – but this was amazing!

Upon setting my eyes on the cathedral ruins, I felt a greater sense of awe than sighting the Colosseum for the first time!

From Wikipedia:  Elgin Cathedral is a historic ruin in Elgin, Moray, north-east Scotland. The cathedral—dedicated to the Holy Trinity—was established in 1224 on land granted by King Alexander II outside the burgh of Elgin and close to the River Lossie. It replaced the cathedral at Spynie, 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) to the north, that was served by a small chapter of eight clerics.

The new and bigger cathedral was staffed with 18 canons in 1226 and then increased to 23 by 1242. After a damaging fire in 1270, a rebuilding programme greatly enlarged the building. It was unaffected by the Wars of Scottish Independence but again suffered extensive fire damage in 1390 following an attack by Robert III’s brother Alexander Stewart, Earl of Buchan, also known as the Wolf of Badenoch.

In 1402 the cathedral precinct again suffered an incendiary attack by the followers of the Lord of the Isles. The number of clerics required to staff the cathedral continued to grow, as did the number of craftsmen needed to maintain the buildings and surrounds. The number of canons had increased to 25 by the time of the Scottish Reformation in 1560, when the cathedral was abandoned and its services transferred to Elgin’s parish church of St Giles.

After the removal of the lead that waterproofed the roof in 1567, the cathedral steadily fell into decay. Its deterioration was arrested in the 19th century, by which time the building was in a substantially ruinous condition.

The cathedral went through periods of enlargement and renovation following the fires of 1270 and 1390 that included the doubling in length of the choir, the provision of outer aisles to the northern and southern walls of both the nave and choir. Today, these walls are at full height in places and at foundation level in others yet the overall cruciform shape is still discernible.

A mostly intact octagonal chapter-house dates from the major enlargement after the fire of 1270. The gable wall above the double door entrance that links the west towers is nearly complete and was rebuilt following the fire of 1390. It accommodates a large window opening that now only contains stub tracery work and fragments of a large rose window. Recessed and chest tombs in both transepts and in the south aisle of the choir contain effigies of bishops and knights, and large flat slabs in the now grass-covered floor of the cathedral mark the positions of early graves. The homes of the dignitaries and canons, or manses, stood in the chanonry and were destroyed by fire on three occasions: in 1270, 1390 and 1402.

The two towers of the west front are mostly complete and were part of the first phase of construction. Only the precentor’s manse is substantially intact; two others have been incorporated into private buildings. A protective wall of massive proportions surrounded the cathedral precinct, but only a small section has survived. The wall had four access gates, one of which—the Pans Port—still exists.

Across the road from the cathedral is the ‘Biblical Garden’…

From the website:  “The creation of the garden, the first of its kind in Scotland, is particularly appropriate on this site, as Moray has for over fourteen centuries played an important role in the development and changing fortunes of the church, similarly, its close proximity to Elgin’s historic cathedral, literally just over the wall make this site the obvious choice.

Whilst using the Bible as its reference point and including all one hundred and ten plants mentioned therein, together with sculptures depicting the parables, it is clearly intended that this garden as well as being of considerable interest to those who study the scriptures, will also encourage anyone who enjoys gardens and gardening, to visit.”

I forgot that today being Boxing Day (the day after Christmas), that it would be closed, but I am very much looking forward to returning on many occasions with a folding chair and a blank notebook…  This place is so very inspiring…

I truly didn’t want to leave Elgin Cathedral, but needs as must… so on my way to my other Scottish castle, I thought I would detour to view the Dyce symbol stones…

…but alas, the same fate awaited me…  closed gates for Boxing Day…  Undeterred, I again hit the road and headed for my next ‘home’ in Scotland – at least for the next week or so…

Welcome to my home away from home…  Ardoe House…

I’ll give you more information on this place later…  For now I have some work to get done…

Sending love and smiles to all…

~ Bella

Your Christmas~New Year Present from my Castle in Scotland

OK, so ‘technically’ it’s not ‘my’ castle, but I like the sound of saying “my castle in Scotland”…  🙂

Since I am not able to be there with you for Christmas and New Year’s, I thought I would at least be able to give you a present to let you know that you are in my thoughts…

So, I recorded you a song!

I may not be the world’s greatest nightingale – and given that I don’t have any fancy recording equipment with me, this was recorded on my iPhone in my room in the castle, and relatively quietly as I didn’t want to disturb the neighbours!, and with a backing track I found on iTunes – but I hope you like it…  I poured all my love for each of you and my newly found home here in Scotland into the song… (just click on the image below to listen)

In case you didn’t know, Auld Lang Syne is a Scottish poem written by Robert Burns in 1788.

Here is Burn’s original verse, although not his original line spacing, and with the words sung in this version of the song in italics:

Should auld acquaintance be forgot, And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot, And auld lang syne!

Chorus.-For auld lang syne, my dear, For auld lang syne.
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet, For auld lang syne.

And surely ye'll be your pint stowp! And surely I'll be mine!
And we'll tak a cup o'kindness yet, For auld lang syne.

For auld, &c.

We twa hae run about the braes, And pou'd the gowans fine;
But we've wander'd mony a weary fit, Sin' auld lang syne.

For auld, &c.

We twa hae paidl'd in the burn, Frae morning sun till dine;
But seas between us braid hae roar'd Sin' auld lang syne.

For auld, &c.

And there's a hand, my trusty fere! And gie's a hand o' thine!
And we'll tak a right gude-willie waught, For auld lang syne.

Chorus.-For auld lang syne, my dear, For auld lang syne.
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet, For auld lang syne.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot, And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot, And auld lang syne!

Before arriving at the castle, I checked out of the wonderfully lovely Loch Ness Inn and said goodbye to everyone…  Btw, I love their folder for the bill (below):

After a short drive through windy mountain roads – that were actually really good! – I arrived at my Christmas residence that was constructed in the late 1870s (almost brand new by castle standards!)…

 

 

After checking in, I decided to go for a meander in Prince and find somewhere lovely to curl up for lunch…

…and found Snow White and a few dwarves in the bushes…

Back home for the evening – and probably for the next couple of days…  I think I will stay curled up here and read and write rather than doing any exploring for the next couple of days…

My room is delightful, complete with hand-made canine friend on the bed waiting for me…

Well, I am about to sign off for Christmas…

May your Christmas Day bring you an abundance of love, happiness, joy and laughter…

All my love…

~ Bella

 

Winter Solstice Cruising Loch Ness

The Winter Solstice marks the darkest day and shortest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere due to the sun being at it’s most southern position, directly above the Tropic of Capricorn.

Today, for the first time since 1664, the sun and Saturn actually line up – and this has resulted in many, many astrologers all over America stating this would be one of the worst days on record for just about anything that anyone wanted to do.  Obviously I didn’t get that memo as my day has been delightful!

There is no parking near where the boat leaves, but it was just a short trek from where I could leave Prince, my trusty vehicular conveyance. 🙂

…back over the Caledonian Canal…

I was a little early so thought I would go to the Clansman Centre that is located in the old schoolhouse, but alas it was locked up – presumably for the season.

So instead I went for a short wander…

What I find refreshing is that this is the one and only place I have seen so far with tacky Nessie merchandise!  I am sure it is available elsewhere, but I have not seen any sign of it.

I came across this wonderful glass blowing shop and gallery…

OK, time to set sail…

The crew let me on before the masses (it pays to be friendly), and when James, our guide asked me, “do you believe in the Loch Ness Monster?” I replied, “I don’t believe she’s a monster.”  He smiled, “that’s the first right answer I have heard.”  He went on to say that hardly anyone says they believe a creature as described even exists…  I said, “there are so many things on this planet about which we have no knowledge – I believe she exists and I believe we should leave her in peace.”

…with a gazillion Japanese tourists – who were obsessive about making certain there was not one speck of water on their seats…

Out through the mouth of the canal and into Loch Ness…

The water is so black because of the peat deposits the water seeps through on its way into the Loch.

Legend says this geological feature is where Nessie attempted to claw her way out of the Loch before sliding back in…

The Japanese visitors were terrified of this pooch…  He couldn’t understand what all the fuss was about…

OK, see this goat in this zoomed close-up?

Now find him…!

Same with this one…

Can you find him now?

James our guide gave an excellent commentary on the use of the sonar and some fascinating facts about the Loch…

Its surface is 16 metres above sea level, over 35km long, with a depth in some places of around 225m / 750ft!

We did see something swimming below the boat that was about the size of a human, but no sign of Nessie… although James mentioned that twice the crew have seen something about the size of a car in the water below – all they can confirm is the depth and that it was a living, moving object.

I also like that James went on to say although people refer to Nessie as a ‘monster’, “if we humans found her, we would trap her, study her, most likely do something to result in her death and then chop her up and study her some more.  So who is the monster now?”

…but wait!!!  Is this Nessie?  🙂

Remember the Mill Shop from yesterday’s post?  I couldn’t resist…

Locally-made pure cashmere scarf and incredible silvery jewellery made from Scottish heather!

From their website:  “Heathergems is a unique and imaginative range of Scottish jewellery and giftware, made in Pitlochry, Scotland from natural heather stems. We are the only manufacturers of this unique Scottish product anywhere in the world.”

…and now I have seen everything – haggis-flavoured crisps!

~ Bella

 

Loch Eil to Loch Ness

Leaving beautiful Fort William this morning, I came across the WWII Commando Memorial.

 

It’s sad that so many memorial halls and monuments were erected after WWI when the nation felt that nothing on that scale could ever happen again…  and then…

I could have happily seated myself beside the Caledonian Canal Locks at Fort Augustus for hours……….  Actually, since I am here for another few days, weather-dependent, I think I just might!

 

 

The canal was constructed in the early nineteenth century by Scottish engineer Thomas Telford.

Sitting on the shore of Loch Ness, Urquhart Castle was founded in the 13th century.

Hmmmm, I guess sometimes we need to point out the obvious…

…and this is home sweet home for the next few days…

…did I mention I LOVE IT HERE…?  🙂

~ Bella

PS:  after back to back calls since 2:00pm, at 9:00pm I headed downstairs to the bar to get a glass of wine (or two) and something to eat, since I hadn’t had dinner.

The waitress told me that the kitchen was already closed but the chef was still here – “what would you like?”

I said, “he doesn’t need to go to any trouble – even cheese on toast will do…”

This is what turned up!  Bacon, cranberry and brie on toasted ciabatta with side salad and dressing…  YUM! …and all of £5!  (and, btw, I had lunch early today here – sooooooooo good!  I told the staff to tell the chef I am abducting him to travel with me!)

There was an older man at the bar watching the end of the soccer game between Manchester United and Bristol.

I seemed to win extra points that I not only knew the ins and outs of soccer (and btw, that of both rugby league and American football), but also my commentary, such as, “excuse me, Mr Referee – your jersey is impartial blue, not Bristol maroon!” or “that was NOT an interference!  That was an Academy Award audition!”…

I don’t follow soccer and don’t have an affinity for either side, but early on, the Bristol team were hamming it up and getting penalty after penalty – and that was an affront to my ‘fair play’ gene – so I went for Manchester – the same team as the older man at the bar (and there were only two of us in the bar!)

I am having such a good time here!!!  Such FUN!!!

Jacobite Train (aka Hogwarts Express)

Voted several years in a row as the top rail journey in the world (Wunderlust Magazine), the Jacobite train trip in Scotland has been on my bucket list for some time.

Starting near the highest mountain in Britain, Ben Nevis, it visits Britain’s most westerly mainland railway station, Arisaig; passes close by the deepest freshwater loch in Britain, Loch Morar and the shortest river in Britain, River Morar, finally arriving next to the deepest seawater loch in Europe, Loch Nevis.

The Jacobite runs a distance of 82 miles return between Fort William and Mallaig, including travelling over the stunning Glenfinnan Viaduct.

The route is also the same shown in the Harry Potter films as the Hogwarts Express.

It was fascinating standing beside the engine and hearing the metal go pop pop pop pop bing pop bing as the heat and cold coincided…

 

 

I found the Loch Ness monster – well, especially since this wasn’t Loch Ness, perhaps Nessie third cousin, twice removed (below)…

 

 

 

 

The pub listed below is sooooo remote, I cannot even find a way to get there other than by boat!

What’s wrong with this photo (below)?

For those who are wondering, no, the Cullen Skink is not lizard soup!  Cullen skink is a thick Scottish soup made of smoked finnan haddock, potatoes and onions – and was yummmmm!

When I was waiting for my ride back to the hotel, the crofter from yesterday saw me – “did my cousin email you yet, Bella?” she asked…  I have made several friends here already – it feels like home!

Oh and just in… this video sent to me by new friends I met on the trip, Tony and Kim, and their family.  Thank you!

 

~ Bella

 

Welcome to the Scottish Highlands…

As I begin writing this post, I am already curled up in the Scottish Highlands – and for those who have been following my posts on both the Luxurious Nomad site and also the LeighStJohn.com site, you would know that it wasn’t until I was in my fifties, did I know what “home” felt like.  That ‘home’ is South Devon – a place I love dearly that is definitely ‘home’.

Upon approaching the Highlands, however, that feeling of ‘home’ was multiplied a thousand-fold.  I adore it here!  As I said to friends, I have never felt so alive with all my senses heightened, rejoicing, and free, while at the same time feeling a solid, never-ending part of the granite underfoot…

So, the journey started in Bournemouth (after an ‘interesting’ stay at a hotel there.  I was attending a Christmas party with friends and the stay was ‘interesting’ because without exception, every French-speaking staff member was less than professional – through to one fellow who I actually chastised for being rude and arrogant!  Well, technically, I said in a very harsh tone, “belligerence suits you however I refuse to accept it!”…  Anyway…  Leaving Bournemouth at sunrise…

The entire drive from there to my first real stop was just under eleven hours so I had originally intended to stop when it started to get dark and continue on the next day – however we (Prince (beloved convertible) and I) made such fabulous time (the roads were wonderful!) that I decided to press on and go all the way to Fort William.

The blue and white sign says “Welcome to Scotland”.

Arriving at my hotel…  Situated on the banks of Loch Linnhie, the Chuachan Hotel is just lovely… and my wonderful Prince managed an average of 41.6mpg for the trip.  Happy Princess Pixie!

Hmmmmmm…  Deep fried haggis…  I don’t think so.

View from my room…

The next morning (today) I was off around sunrise to go exploring…  It’s not every day one sees a timber lorry in the middle of town…

Beware – killer ducks…

It was a brisk 3oC / 37oF and I was happily cruising around with both windows open…

This (below) is the Glenfinnan Monument, honouring those who fought and died fighting the Jacobite cause…

When I pulled over to view this beautiful church, a man pulled up beside me and said, “I saw that you stopped earlier at the viaduct parking but then left – you know that you can park there and although it looks a long way away, it’s only about a 300m walk and you can see the steam train crossing the viaduct.  It goes past just after quarter-to-eleven.”

I thanked him – for yes, I did stop there and it looked like the viewing point was a mile hike so I wasn’t going to do it…

He then said, “the church is lovely – if you go to the back, you get a fabulous view!”

Again I thanked him – he said, “Ok, cheerio and Merry Christmas!” and drove off!

He was right about the view from the back of the church…

After checking out the church, I explored for a while longer before heading back to the viaduct area…

 

 

 

 

Parking Prince here, I set off on foot to find the viaduct…

It was soooooo incredibly peaceful and quiet…….

Found it!

Harry Potter fans may find this view familiar…

These guys…

…were all the way up here!

…to get a view of this…

The Jacobite train – and again, yes, this is the same train used in the Harry Potter films…

I was taking photos of these very cute sheep…

…and this fellow came over to tell me that he was out walking and he thought they were lovely as well – and since I wasn’t from here (that came up in conversation) I should continue on this road to the Old Inverlochy Castle…

So, continue I did – over the “weak bridge” – doesn’t exactly fill one with confidence!…

The castle was built in the 13th century…

I went to drive down this road (below) and the man waved me down and told me it was just a muddy track around the bend…  He was ever so friendly – everyone I have encountered here is just LOVELY!

Decided to deliver Prince back safe and sound to the hotel and take a taxi to a cute-looking restaurant I had spied on the loch…

…had I not done the Brixham Fish Market experience, the intricacies of this painting would be lost on me…

I was there literally for five hours…  Working, eating and drinking, chatting with new friends… and watching the sky change…

 

Most dogs find a stick – this one finds a chunk of lumber! 🙂

Bringing in the catch…

…and on my way home, my taxi driver told me about what life is like as a crofter – that’s her other life!  Btw, crofting is basically a type of small-scale farming up here in the Highlands…

I love the Scottish Highlands more than I knew it was possible to love a place…

…and I have only been here one day!  It feels like months…

~ Bella